OracleAppsBlog
A day in the life of an Oracle Applications Consultant

Modules

Wednesday, February 15, 2006

Connecticut State Governments integrated Financial, HR and Payroll System

I came across the Core CT site today and found it to be a site with a wealth of information relating to systems implementation.

According to the site:

Core-CT is the system that has replaced Connecticut state government’s core financial and administrative computer systems including central and agency accounting, accounts payable, payroll, time and attendance, worker’s compensation, personnel, and other legacy systems. For years before Core-CT was implemented, these systems were plagued by poor integration, redundant data entry, and time-wasting reconciliation. They were written in a number of different languages, resided on many platforms, and included numerous databases. This older technology was not adaptable to workflow and e-commerce.

The state’s central administrative agencies - the Office of the State Comptroller, the Departments of Administrative Services and Information Technology, and the Office of Policy and Management - banded together to undertake the transition to a new, integrated system encompassing virtually all major administrative functions and all executive-branch state agencies. The system uses enterprise resource planning (ERP) software to tie together all functions, using an integrated suite of software applications, a common database, and a unified technical architecture.

The Core-CT fact sheet outlines what modules and systems were implemented as follows:

Core-CT is Connecticut state government’s central financial and administrative computer system. Using PeopleSoft’s ERP suite, the system encompasses central and agency accounting functions, including modules for general ledger, purchasing, accounts payable, accounts receivable, billing, assets, and inventory, with projects and contracts scheduled to be implemented in 2006; as well as PeopleSoft’s Human Resource Management System, with modules for payroll, time and labor, human resources, and benefits. Core-CT covers all these functions for executive branch agencies, and some of its functions are also used by the Judicial Branch, the General Assembly, and state institutions of higher education. In addition, Core-CT uses PeopleSoft’s EPM ad-hoc reporting function to allow queries on its vast database.

Currently, the system uses PeopleSoft Financials version 8.4 but will be upgrading to version 8.8 around July 2006; HRMS uses PeopleSoft version 8.3 and will be upgrading to 8.9 around May 2006. Some 7,600 state workers use Core-CT. They pay the state’s bills in a $15.3 billion annual budget (fiscal year 2006), including the payroll for all state employees.

Launched in 2003, Core-CT is based at the Department of Information Technology’s East Hartford, CT office; it is managed jointly by the Office of the State Comptroller, the Department of Administrative Services, and DOIT; these agencies hold the statutory authority for the system’s functions.  Approximately 150 people work in the development and maintenance of Core-CT.

Other interesting areas of the site include the Presentation Library, Document Library and Chart of Accounts Documentation. I also thought the catalog of online financial reports provides a good example of how reports should be documented.

Friday, February 10, 2006

Oracle Announces New Releases of Internal Controls Manager and Financial Consolidation Hub

I’ve been interested in Internal Controls Manager ever since the first release and like what Oracle is doing with it. Apparently they now have about 250 customers using ICM.

Oracle Financial Consolidation Hub version 2 is available now whilst Oracle Internal Controls Manager version 5 is scheduled to be generally available in 2006.

According to the Press Statement:

The new versions will help to ensure the quality and transparency of financial information across the enterprise by integrating the preparation of financial statements with the periodic evaluation of a company’s internal controls.

Finance teams have traditionally managed consolidation and reporting separately from compliance certification efforts. This meant that finance teams had to report financial results without complete knowledge of the risks, mitigations, and audit tests that lay behind each financial statement line item, or finance teams had to track these relationships manually. In the latest release, Oracle Financial Consolidation Hub introduces full integration with Oracle Internal Controls Manager to converge financial reporting and compliance certification processes. Oracle’s corporate performance and compliance management applications are built on a single analytic platform, which provides the framework necessary for consistent processes and certification across disparate source systems. The single data model delivers greater visibility and helps increase confidence in financial results by presenting consolidated global financial results with related risks and mitigations.

Friday, February 03, 2006

Oracle Navigation and ADI Tip Sheets

Last year I worked with Nici Aldridge on an IMSCAN document management and scanning solution for an Oracle E-Business Suite implementation. Nici is an Oracle Applications Consultant who does quite a substantial amount of Oracle Training - read her profile here. She shared with me some “tip sheets” she has produced for Oracle Applications Navigation and Oracle’s Application Desktop Integrator (ADI). These tips sheets are very short documents which are aimed at providing users with the basic information they need to get started with.

Other tip sheets are available for:

  • Office 2000 - Generic Information for Office 2000
  • Word 2000 - For those converting to Word 2000
  • Outlook 2000 - For those converting to Outlook 2000
  • PowerPoint 2000 - For those converting to PowerPoint 2000
  • PowerPoint for Presenters - Suggestions for using PowerPoint effectively in PC-based presentations
  • Visual Aids - Suggestions for choosing and using visual aids, including PC slides

Thursday, October 06, 2005

Oracle Business Intelligence (BI) Blog

I came across a really cool Oracle BI blog the other day and have been meaning to let y’all know about it so that you can add it to your list of feeds. 

According to the blog description Oracle Business Intelligence Blog, is a Blog for all things Oracle Business Intelligence. Includes musings and postings on Oracle Discoverer, OLAP, and other Oracle BI products, technologies and tools.

Blog contributors are:

Abhinav Agarwal – Product manager for Oracle Discoverer since 2002. And a whole lot of varied work experience before that.
Keith Laker – Product manager for Oracle BI Beans since 2002. Previously worked in both Oracle consultancy and support.

Last 10 posts:

  1. More on the bubble graph
  2. Making more of BI Graphs….
  3. Creative Use of the IQY Export Format
  4. Loose lips sink ships
  5. Performance improvements and SQL optimizations
  6. Larry Ellison on BI
  7. On Vendor Weirdness
  8. UIX Hack 3 - Removing the ‘type’ column from a portlet
  9. How read is a blog before you can call it a well-read blog
  10. Activity Guide to OOW BI&DW Sessions

Wednesday, September 21, 2005

Oracle buys G-log, a logistics and transportation management software company

I thought Oracle had bought enough companies this year, evidently not. They’ve just announced the purchase of G-log which will provide a Comprehensive Logistics Management Platform to Complement Oracle’s Supply Chain Applications. According to the press statement:

Redwood Shores, Calif   20-SEP-2005   Oracle announced today that it agreed to buy G-Log, a privately held provider of logistics and transportation management software. The parties anticipate closing the transaction by the end of 2005, subject to certain regulatory approvals and other customary conditions. Financial details were not disclosed.

Globalization, increasing fuel costs, outsourcing, increased security and regulation, and transportation capacity shortages are driving the need for sophisticated logistics and transportation applications. G-Log delivers a single platform to plan, optimize, execute, analyze, and react to every aspect of supply chain flow. By bringing together logistics processes, data, knowledge and analysis in a single business engine, G-Log’s products allow companies to lower the total cost of ownership while giving them the ability to drive an integrated, information driven enterprise.

“The acquisition of G-Log will allow Oracle to offer a comprehensive supply chain and logistics management solution through which companies can better manage their global supply chains,” said Oracle Senior Vice President of Applications Development Rick Jewell. “With G-Log’s proven transportation management platform and Oracle’s leading technology infrastructure, ERP and supply chain applications, customers will now have an integrated offering for the lean enterprise.”

Over 50 percent of G-Log’s customers have Oracle applications and after completion of the acquisition, it is expected customers will recognize immediate benefits from the combination. G-Log’s customer base includes industry-leading shippers and logistics service providers such as Big Lots, Brown Shoe, DuPont, Exel, Family Dollar Stores, Giant Eagle, Halliburton, Kuehne & Nagel, Rohm and Haas, Tesco, Toll Solutions, UPM and Volvo.

“By combining the talents and products of both organizations, Oracle will be better able to address evolving customer needs and effectively respond to industry trends that are driving the demand for complex logistics solutions,” said G-Log Chief Executive Officer David Cairns.

This is an interesting deal, according to an AMR Research article, entitled Oracle Buys G-Log, Potential Top Slot in SCM:

If Oracle can execute and all other market assumptions stay the same, the acquisition has the potential to propel Oracle past SAP to the No. 1 slot in 2005 Supply Chain Management (SCM) market share.

Looks like Oracle is definitely turning up the heat on SAP! I read with great amusement this ITtoolbox article entitled SAP executive knocks Oracle-Siebel deal, says Oracle will fail which outlines how Bill McDermott, chief executive of SAP’s North American unit, told participants at a recent mergers-and-acquisition conference,  Oracle “continues to fail, will continue to fail, and we’re going to help them in every way we can.” Looks like things are getting nasty!!

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